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A beautiful day in the neighborhood – Inspired Quotes of Mr. Rogers [slideshow]

Fred McFeely Rogers ( March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003 ) was an American educator most widely known for creating and hosting Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood (1968–2001). Rogers created the television show as a result of his displeasure with the way television addressed children at the time. In 1968 he began a broadcasting career which would last three decades and become an icon of American entertainment and education, a symbol for compassion and morality.

The greatest gift you ever give is your honest self.

 

I don’t think anyone can grow unless he’s loved exactly as he is now, appreciated for what he is rather than what he will be.

Did you know? Mister Rogers seems to have been almost exactly the same off-screen as he was onscreen. As an ordained Presbyterian minister, and a man of tremendous faith, Mister Rogers preached tolerance first. Whenever he was asked to castigate non-Christians or gays for their differing beliefs, he would instead face them and say, with sincerity, “God loves you just the way you are.” Often this provoked ire from fundamentalists. Read the full text here

 

There are three ways to ultimate success: The first way is to be kind. The second way is to be kind. The third way is to be kind.

Did you Know? Most people have heard of Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who could speak about 1000 words in American Sign Language, and understand about 2000 in English. What most people don’t know, however, is that Koko was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fan. As Esquire reported, when Fred Rogers took a trip out to meet Koko for his show, not only did she immediately wrap her arms around him and embrace him, she did what she’d always seen him do onscreen: she proceeded to take his shoes off! Read the full text here

 

Knowing that we can be loved exactly as we are gives us all the best opportunity for growing into the healthiest of people.

Did you know? According to a TV Guide profile, Fred Rogers drove a plain old Impala for years. One day, however, the car was stolen from the street near the TV station. When Rogers filed a police report, the story was picked up by every newspaper, radio and media outlet around town. Amazingly, within 48 hours the car was left in the exact spot where it was taken from, with an apology on the dashboard. It read, “If we’d known it was yours, we never would have taken it.” Full text here

 

The world needs a sense of worth, and it will achieve it only by its people feeling that they are worthwhile.

 

I’m proud of you for the times you came in second, or third, or fourth, but what you did was the best you have ever done.

 

Peace means far more than the opposite of war.

 

The connections we make in the course of a life – maybe that’s what heaven is.

Did you Know? Mister Rogers was known as one of the toughest interviews because he’d often befriend reporters, asking them tons of questions, taking pictures of them, compiling an album for them at the end of their time together, and calling them after to check in on them and hear about their families. He wasn’t concerned with himself, and genuinely loved hearing the life stories of others. Amazingly, it wasn’t just with reporters. Once, on a fancy trip up to a PBS exec’s house, he heard the limo driver was going to wait outside for 2 hours, so he insisted the driver come in and join them (which flustered the host). On the way back, Rogers sat up front, and when he learned that they were passing the driver’s home on the way, he asked if they could stop in to meet his family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life—the house supposedly lit up when Rogers arrived, and he played jazz piano and bantered with them late into the night. Further, like with the reporters, Rogers sent him notes and kept in touch with the driver for the rest of his life. Full text here

 

Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime’s work, but it’s worth the effort.

Did you Know? In covering Rogers’ daily routine (waking up at 5; praying for a few hours for all of his friends and family; studying; writing, making calls and reaching out to every fan who took the time to write him; going for a morning swim; getting on a scale; then really starting his day), writer Tom Junod explained that Mr. Rogers weighed in at exactly 143 pounds every day for the last 30 years of his life. He didn’t smoke, didn’t drink, didn’t eat the flesh of any animals, and was extremely disciplined in his daily routine. And while I’m not sure if any of that was because he’d mostly grown up a chubby, single child, Junod points out that Rogers found beauty in the number 143. According to the piece, Rogers came “to see that number as a gift… because, as he says, “the number 143 means ‘I love you.’ It takes one letter to say ‘I’ and four letters to say ‘love’ and three letters to say ‘you.’ One hundred and forty-three.” Full text here

Love and trust, in the space between what’s said and what’s heard in our life, can make all the difference in the world.

 

You rarely have time for everything you want in this life, so you need to make choices. And hopefully your choices can come from a deep sense of who you are.

 

Often when you think you’re at the end of something, you’re at the beginning of something else.

 

Mr. Rogers defends PBS infront of U.S. Senate

‘The Garden of your mind’ Mr. Rogers Neighborhood Remix

More information on Fred Rogers:

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